There is no honor in revenge. Or aging gracefully.

Our man Steven Seagal (Under Siege 2) just might be the hardest working man in the direct-to-video market. Take a gander at the guy’s IMDB filmography: he’s got like 12 movies in 2016 and 10 more on the way. God bless you good sir.

Only downside: he’s choosing the worst projects to commit himself to.

Case in point: this terrible thing.

Seagal is Colonel Robert Sikes a former special ops legend whose family is involved in a brutal tragedy, setting him on a blood-soaked path of vengeance. The recipients of his mortal combat are criminals. It doesn’t matter what they did. Drugs. Assault. Gun-running. Jaywalking. If they broke a civil statute, then they’ve gotta go.

Deadly vigilantism doesn’t sit well with everybody, though. Hardboiled cop William Porter (Craig Sheffer) is determined to put an end to the rampage. Thing is, he and Sikes go way back, having served together. Now they’re on opposites of an urban war and there’s only one thing they have in common: they’re both in the same terrible movie.

And make no mistake, Code of Honor is terrible. I’m more than happy to grant a wide-ish berth to action movies, even the low-budget ones that skip the cinemas. Because you never know, right?

I should have seen this coming, as I can’t remember the last decent Seagal movie I’ve seen. Maybe Out for Justice? Still, even as rough as these Seagal outings have been, I do believe Code of Honor represents a new low.

From top to bottom this is amateur honor. Wooden acting, a hamfisted plot and dull action scenes all combine to turn this viewing experience into the equivalent of an impact driver to the sternum.

Worse, Seagal is near-immobile here, with virtually all of his action beats either performed by a stunt double or generated through shoddy CGI (the less said about his rappel scene the better).

That’s all I got for you. There’s nothing redeeming about Code of Honor. It’s the kind of phlegm-wad that has contributed to the (rightfully earned) negative stigma that has besieged the term “straight-to-video” all these years. Head for the hills.

A lean Code of Honor Blu-ray: 1.78:1, 1080p, DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, no extras.

THE VERDICT
Dishonorably discharged.

 

buynowamz

Tech Specs

Code of Honor  (Blu-ray)
2016, Lionsgate, 106 minutes, R (2016)
VIDEO: 1.78:1, 1080p  AUDIO:  DTS-HD MA 5.1 (English) SUBTITLES: English SDH, Spanish
EXTRAS: None      ACCOMPLICES: IMDB

 

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